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Announcing Full Tuition Scholarships!

By on Apr 4, 2016

New LLM Scholarship Awarded to Kenyan Attorney

By on Jul 22, 2015

The work of the Kenya Legal Project continues with the selection of the first Kenyan LL.M. scholarship recipient – Jim Karani Riungu. Today, Natasha Dolezal, director of the LLM program and Kenya Legal Project, was pleased to offer Jim the scholarship in person. Jim is an attorney and advocate of the High Court of Kenya currently working for WildlifeDirect and the Hands Off Our Elephants campaign – an NGO focussed on saving Kenya’s elephant population through strengthening the law and enforcement related to wildlife crimes.  Congratulations and we look forward to welcoming Jim to the Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law...

Oregon Senate Stands Up for Elephants and Rhinos

By on Apr 28, 2015

Senate Votes to End Illegal Ivory and Rhino Horn Trade The following statement describes the recent Oregon Senate passage of Senate Bill 913. The bill was voted on today and passed out of the Senate and will now move to the House side. The Kenya Legal Project will continue to assist and work with coalition partners in the next few weeks towards the passage of this bill. We are proud the Oregon Senate stood up for elephants and rhinos and against those voices opposed. (April 28, 2015) – The Oregon Senate approved legislation with a 19-11 vote to ban the sale of ivory and rhino horn in the state. SB 913, championed by Sen. Mark Hass (D-Beaverton), would strengthen regulation and complement federal law to stop the underground trade and protect these species from extinction. Scott Beckstead, Oregon senior state director for The Humane Society of the United States, issued the following...

SB 913: Oregon bill aimed at helping protect the elephants and rhinos in Africa

By on Apr 8, 2015

Oregon bill could help endangered animals in Africa By Monique Balas | For The Oregonian/OregonLive The Oregonian Email the author | Follow on Twitter on April 07, 2015 at 3:00 PM, updated April 07, 2015 at 5:05 PM A bill in the Oregon Senate could help save lives of endangered animals living continents away. Senate Bill 913, also referred to as the ivory and rhino horn bill, would ban commercial sales of ivory and rhino horns and their products. The bill, which would penalize first-time offenders with up to 30 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,250, is sponsored by Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton.   “Like everyone else, I’m horrified by the elephant poaching in Africa — and the fact that it’s on the rise,” Hass wrote in an e-mail to Pet Talk. “Oregon has a strong history of a conservation spirit and I think people here will happily extend it to other...

Kenya Legal Project offered hands on experience. . .

By on Jul 31, 2014

      Kenya Legal Project offered animal-law students opportunity for hands-on experience – The Oregonian   July 7, 2014 – Animal-law students and faculty who recently participated in a two-week summer program in Kenya say the experience was eye-opening and underscored the importance of their work. The group of eight, which included seven students and one practicing attorney, spent two weeks in the African country as part of a pilot program coordinated by Lewis & Clark Law School’s Center for Animal Law Studies. Participants in the Kenya Legal Project met with African conservation organizations, wildlife groups and prosecutors to discuss ways to end poaching, animal trafficking and cruelty in the country. “It was nice for the students to have that hands-on experience as a juxtaposition to the work they typically do, which is more...

For Poco. . .

By on May 30, 2014

Written by Rachel Sekine, third year law student I think I can speak for us all when I say I can’t believe our time in Kenya is coming to an end.  Today,   we had our final meetings for our trip at Ol Pejeta, a wildlife conservancy of over 90,000 acres.  Apart from Kenya’s 27 national parks, 31 national reserves, and 8 sanctuaries, Kenya has over 142 wildlife conservancies.  In the past, national parks, reserves, and sanctuaries had legal protocols to follow, while conservancies did not.  Local people set up conservancies on their own as communities voluntarily set aside land for wildlife.  Over time, conservancies vastly outnumbered the governmental land specifically set aside for wildlife.  The Wildlife Conservation and Management Act has evolved to include legal standards for these conservancies, which include licensing and management requirements. As a conservancy, Ol...

Impala: The Other White Meat?

By on May 27, 2014

Written by Angie Ostrowski, 3rd year law student When people talk about poaching in Kenya, they are usually referring to elephant tusks and rhino horns. While these are extremely important issues, there is also the lesser-known poaching issue of bush meat. Although there is less of a focus on bush meat, it is still important from the perspective of animal welfare and public health. The bush meat trade involves poachers setting traps, typically wire snares, in the bush to catch whatever animals happen to walk by. The traps catch zebra, eland, impala, warthogs, and even giraffe. The bush meat is then sold for public consumption and is in demand because it costs a fraction of the price of traditional forms of meat. Animal welfare issues arise from the animals suffering painful deaths when the wire tightens around their necks and crushes them. Public health issues arise because no research...

Driven to Help Animals

By on May 26, 2014

Written by Meg York, third year law student Twende! Let’s go! Our excitement was palpable. Our eyes scanned for animals the second we passed through the main gate of Nairobi National Park. Sam couldn’t help but chuckle at our enthusiasm, slowing the Land Cruiser each time any of us thought we saw something. Shortly after entering the park, we stopped to spend time at the Ivory Burning site where Kenya burned its stockpile in 1989. Ashes and tusk bits formed a large mound in the center of a fire pit—a memoriam to lives lost and a hope for the future. We piled back into the vehicle, kicked off our dress shoes, and stood on the Cruiser’s seats, poking our heads through openings in the roof. From our roof-top vantage point, the park looked alive. Sunlight reflected off the sand-colored grass, punctuated by intermittent dark areas like the body of a giraffe. At the end of the expanse rose...